Monday, January 30, 2012

Harvest Monday - January 30, 2012

Again I've got no harvests. I have been eating up my stores. I finished the last of the bok choy that was picked before Christmas so it lasted a long long time in the fridge. I'm still working on the tatsoi. I expect it to last until mid February before I need to have eaten it all. I've found the best way to store such things is in a sealed container that just fits them without squishing them with a towel on the bottom. The towel keeps them from rotting and sliming out on the bottom and the container keeps the air at 100% humidity. Greens last a very long time stored this way.

I also ate some tomatoes for the first time since August when I found out I had solanine poisoning (nightshade poisoning). I made some beef stew. Well I can't eat them yet. I can have trace amounts without reacting, but not a meal that has the solanum family as a core ingredient. It did taste delicious though. I miss tomatoes so much.

So instead of me eating it my son got to eat the rest and I put some in the freezer for next time he is here. It had a lot of garden ingredients. It had tomatoes, carrots, shelling beans that I had frozen, onions, celery, and rosemary.

Harvest Monday is a day to show off your harvests, how you are saving your harvest, or how you are using your harvest. If you have a harvest you want to show off, add your name and link to Mr Linky below.

26 comments:

  1. Oh I hope you recover soon! The stew looks delicious.

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  2. Boy that stew looks wonderful! I also find that the Asian veggies last a long time in the frig. Thanks for the towel tip. Maybe now they will last even longer!

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  3. Your stew looks so yummy. Hopefully when this year's tomato harvesting begins you are recovered.

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  4. Your tip on the towel and covered container is useful and something to file away for future use. I rarely have anything in the crisper that long but once in a while I get a huge harvest of greens in the spring and cannot use them up fast enough. Hate to waste any of it - so being able to store it longer would be useful.

    Sorry you were not able to enjoy tomatoes as a featured item in a dish, but at least you are moving up to having small amounts of the solanae family in things.

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  5. Sustainably ModernJanuary 30, 2012 at 8:48 AM

    You may not have a new harvest, but you are still enjoying your harvests! Makes me wonder....should you estimate how much your harvest is worth based on when you actually harvest them from the garden or when you actually eat them because the cost of zukes in the winter is $1 more per pound than they are in the summer...same with most other foods.

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  6. so sorry you couldn't eat your soup; looks delish! It's great though that you were able to store enough to be able to eat when the garden isn't producing.

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  7. Looks like the temperature is right for soup. A little warm here, more like smoothies for us,

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  8. Your stew looks and sounds delicious! I hope you continue to recover so you can enjoy some of it one day (hopefully) soon! Thanks for the tip about the greens in a container! Brilliant! Hope you have a fantastic week!

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  9. The soup looks wonderful and I appreciate the tips on storing bok choy.

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  10. Boy would that stew taste good right about now. We are not having a normal winter but close enough to say it is cold out there.

    Sure hope by harvest time you are able to enjoy tomatoes again. I don't think I could cook without them.

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  11. Thanks for the tip on how to store greens for a long time. :)

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  12. Great looking soup! I sure hope you get over this tomato thing soon! I feel bad for you every time I have one!

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  13. yummy that looks great. Glad to hear that the bok choy can keep for so long!

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  14. My post this week is just an update of last week's, with a question for all you smarter gardeners out there--what do I do about the new peach tree I planted? (I've posted a not-very-good picture.)

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  15. I do pretty much the same thing with my greens. Right now I'm working on a huge head of napa cabbage, I keep it wrapped in a towel in a plastic bag and pull off the outer leaves as I want them. I've been working my way through that cabbage for a month now.

    So sorry to hear that you still haven't gotten over the solanine problem, how hugely frustrating.

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  16. The stew looks delicious, sorry you couldn't eat it, hope you feel better soon.

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  17. OH NO! Still no maters? I'm SO SORRY... I feel so bad for you. I simply can't imagine.

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  18. I understand the yearning for eating something you love except I'm allergic to wheat, soy, melons, nuts, berries, and chocolate. Take care of yourself! Hopefully it will wear off after a few years.

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  19. That a great tip for greens. How do you get nightshade poisoning?

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  20. meemsnyc, that was back in the summer (the poison hides in your body and takes a long time to get out). It can be absorbed through your skin. It is in most of the solanum family and I breathed it in. My guess is that I'm sensitive to it too. So if I grow tomatoes and peppers again, when I work in them it will be fully covered and masked. I'll also use gloves to pull out our numerous nightshade plants that are weeds in the garden. Nightshade is a really common weed around here.

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  21. I do feel for you no being able to have tomatoes - hopefully it will resolve itself sooner rather than later. Great tip about the greens - thankyou.

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  22. Nightshade poisoning? First time to hear about this... need to look it up the net and see...

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  23. Yummy soup! Maybe your allergy will go away and you can enjoy the frozen soup. Thanks for the tip on storing greens!

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  24. Two years ago, I bought my first house. I planted my Dream Garden and promptly developed an allergy to the entire nightshade family. What a nightmare.

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  25. Wow...how on earth do you get nightshade poisoning?

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  26. It is absorbed through the skin and breathed in too. So from my tomato plants probably. Though we do have a lot of nightshade weeds around here.

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