Monday, November 11, 2013

Harvest Monday, November 11th, 2013

Last week was mostly about using up the huge Michihili cabbage. The only reason the scallions and carrots were harvested was because I needed them to make Peking raviolis with the cabbage.

Ditto with the garlic chives and cilantro. Garlic chives are weird for me. I so love the smell and taste and yet I never seem to use them for anything but Peking ravs. But in those they are essential.

I picked two bok choy for a dinner that never happened. We ended up going out to eat. I like bok choy as a green as my daughter will eat it. She won't eat spinach, chard, or kale. But she will eat bok choy. Well as long as it is fairly plain.

And I winnowed and weighed my ripe mustard. Which is good as I had run out of whole mustard and my ground mustard had barely any left.
  • Alliums 1.08 lbs
  • Carrots 0.85 lbs
  • Greens, Asian 9.11 lbs
  • Herbs 0.56 lbs
  • Weekly Tally 11.59 lbs
  • Yearly Tally 502.63 lbs, $1041.04

Harvest Monday is a day to show off your harvests, how you are saving your harvest, or how you are using your harvest. If you have a harvest you want to show off, add your name and link to Mr Linky below.

25 comments:

  1. I had to google Peking ravioli but now I know we have been cooking much the same thing this week, although mine I called gyoza as I think there are more Japanese pot stickers sold here than Chinese ones (but I might be very wrong....). The wrappers may vary a bit, but I think the fillings are fairly similar - mince (usually pork or chicken), cabbage, garlic chives, spring onions and ginger. Does that sound familiar?

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    1. Yes I ought to say potstickers but in Boston they are usually called Peaking raviolis. The name comes from Joyce Chen who named them that at her restaurant here and the name stuck in our region. It isn't used in most of the US. And we often just steam them so really they are gyoza. But no matter what they contain Chinese cabbage, garlic chives, spring onions, and yes ginger. Though I've now run out of my bunching onions. I might make some with just regular onions. I've never done that before. But really you can put anything in a dumpling wrapper and use that yummy soy-ginger dipping sauce and it will be delicious.

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    2. In Chinese they are called 'jiaozi' when just steamed and 'guotie' when fried. They are quite Northern Chinese things to eat where wheat based dishes like these dumplings and noodles are common. The Lad and I first went to China in the 80s and have been going back and forward most years since then. I love them.

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  2. Liz, The term Peking ravioli was coined by Joyce Chen who opened a Chinese restaurant in the Italian section of Boston years ago, figuring a familiar word would make the dish acceptable to the patrons in the area. I believe Boston is the only place that uses this term instead of the more familiar "pot stickers" used in other part of the country.
    Daphne, Your Asian greens are so perfect, I really need to seriously look into using row covers, any advice?

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    1. If you want cheap, use netting fabric. It isn't perfect but at under $1/yd it is very cheap and you can see your crop under it. It comes in 72" wide fabrics which are enough to cover a 4' wide bed with dwarf veggies like Shanghai boc choy. I like it better than agribon as it doesn't hold heat. But then again because it doesn't hold heat so you can't use it for season extension. But great in the not freezing weather.

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    2. Thanks, forgot about the netting fabric I have in the shed, making a note for next year.

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    3. I was curious about the same thing, and also learned that Peking Raviolis is a term invented by Joyce Chen and particular to the Boston area...

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  3. Whatever you call them, the pot stickers sound yummy! Your Asian greens do look great, which is not easy to pull off. There are so many bugs and other critters that like to eat them. Here it is mostly slugs which are eating anything green.

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  4. Beautiful harvest, love carrots and bok choy.

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  5. Beautiful and quite impressive greens and that Chinese cabbage! Wow! My fall greens were a bust this year. I really need to utilize row covers next year to protect my greens from deer and insects. Your photos are inspirational.

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  6. Great harvest as always and your greens look perfect!

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  7. I have garlic chives too but I rarely use them. They would be a nice addition to many dishes. Thanks for reminding me.

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  8. You are such an inspiration! My winter garden is a sad mess, mostly because I've been busy restoring my 1940s era kitchen.

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  9. That's a huge cabbage you have there and the bok choy is so pristine looking, I need to use row covers for my greens, the outer leaves are full of holes not pretty looking.

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  10. Beautiful! You make fall look like spring.

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  11. That cabbage is amazing. It's been ages since I had pot stickers, I may have to make some when I get around to harvesting my napa cabbages.

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  12. Very nice! The only time I've tried to grow bok choy they bolted to seed and I didn't harvest a single one. You've inspired me to try again. Cheers!

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  13. Your little bok choi look fat and happy. I've been trying to grow some over spring but they have been a complete failure. I think I will have to stick with them as a cooler weather crop. You make your own mustard?

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    1. Yes I do. Right now I have plenty in the fridge though so luckily won't need to dip into these mustard seeds quite yet.

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  14. So nice to see your garden still producing, we're definitely on the downside of the season...

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  15. Nice things from your garden. The bok choi looks yummy. I have never grown it before. Nancy

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  16. Always nice to read about your harvest. I´m on again, I mean - I will try. ;-) /Bondj√§ntan ("Farmergirl") Johnna Gilljam

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  17. A little late joining Harvest Monday, but I had a few unusual harvests (so late in November!) that I thought were interesting enough to link up. I hope you'll enjoy it, thanks!

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