Monday, June 21, 2010

Harvest Monday - 21 June 2010

I brought a cooler over to harvest from the old garden this time. Last week I had too much wilted produce. The cooler worked fabulously. I'll have to remember to bring it every week.

I was hoping for a good raspberry harvest photo for you, but they are still ramping up. I did get raspberries, but only a small handful that were eaten before a photo was taken. At least a few were weighed. I've given my Realtor permission to pick any when she sees them for two reasons. First is because they need picking every two days to not lose any raspberries and I doubt I'll be back that often. I've experimented with picking every three days and you loose some to rot. Second, she has memories of going to her Grandmother's house as a kid and gorging herself on raspberries. Her eyes just lit up with happiness. And I like the image of my perfectly coiffed and put together RE Agent picking raspberries all made up. I'm so not that person. I wear very few things where I can't run out to garden at the drop of a hat and get dirty. I might wear skirts 90% of the time, but they are all cotton wash and wear type skirts.

This week was my big scape week. I harvested over 6 oz of them. I grow about four dozen garlic plants every year which I've found is a bit too much. I like garlic, but I also like garlic powder. Maybe this year I'll make some for the first time.

I had more salad turnips. This time I picked them small. I liked the large one since it was about the same weight as all theses small ones all combined, but I'm afraid they might turn woody in the heat or worse bolt. And I do weigh them without the greens since I don't eat turnip greens. I know some do, but I haven't yet.

The Yakatta-Na was still not showing any signs of bolting. I picked another head. I'm really liking this green. I'm going to go back this week and see if they held up through our hot 90F weather we had for a few days. It was hot enough to melt our new driveway. If it can hold up through that it will be grown every summer.

I picked a bit of lettuce and mizuna for my salads. I was letting the last two Freckles and Paris Island stay though. I wanted to see which one bolted first. Well I went back on Saturday and Freckles is bolting first. I'm liking the texture of Paris Island better too. I like the crunch of that romaine. Freckles is pretty but most of its leaves just aren't substantial enough for me.


The big harvest of the week were the snap peas. I turned a lot into pickled peas which I served at my housewarming party. They got a lot of compliments. Now I need to throw some more into the brine for some for me. I eat them on burgers and I use them in my salads.

As for spending money, I got my composter from the city of Cambridge. They sold the one I wanted for $50 and they didn't care that I wasn't a Cambridge resident. It is being amortized over 10 years. I figure this year anything I buy that will last will get amortized. I've got a little spreadsheet that lets me put that in and adds it automatically to my tally. It tells me the year that it expires so I can remove it at the right time.

And as a side note. I'm shocked and delighted that Harvest Monday is taking off so much. I figured it would top out at 20 people each week during the summer, but it is still growing. Last week went over thirty. It is fun to see everyone's harvest, but it is a little overwhelming to keep up with every week. I've switched to not responding to everyone's comments since most are just nice harvest comments, which I love, but don't really require a response. A comment that requires a response, like a question, will get one still, never fear. But the real thing I want to try to keep up with is visiting all the links.

  • Alliums 0.36 lbs
  • Berries 0.07 lbs
  • Green 0.90 lbs
  • Peas 1.55 lbs
  • Turnips 0.05 lbs
  • Spent this week: $5
  • Total harvested this week 2.92 lbs
  • Total for the year 19.09 lbs
  • 2010 Tally -$200.53

Harvest Monday is a day to show off your harvests, how you are saving your harvest, or how you are using your harvest. If you have a harvest you want to show off, add your name and link to Mr Linky below.

42 comments:

  1. It’s interesting to see how more and more people are posting for Harvest Monday. Harvest is the reason why we grow all that food.
    I was also looking forward to your raspberry picture, as I read your last post. Nevertheless, it is a great harvest for a beginning of summer.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your peas look wonderful! Mine finally flowered and I am anxious for them to produce!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm also jealous of your peas. I'm still waiting on mine.

    We had mostly lettuce this week.

    ReplyDelete
  4. That was really nice of you to let your realtor pick. I find that people who don't veggie garden always seem to light up when presented with an opportunity to visit one or pick from one.

    Glad to hear the cooler is working out for you. Greens seem to wilt so easily under present conditions.

    ReplyDelete
  5. It is amazing how Harvest Monday has grown! It does take some time to visit everyone's blog, but I have learned a lot from reading about others experiences. There is nothing like first hand accounts. Thanks again for hosting this, Daphne!

    I'm not familiar with that Yakatta-Na green. I will have to check it out. My Fun Jen is not happy with our hot weather at all.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm just impressed that you can balance both gardens now. I'd never get back to the original one! I'm so glad for you that they're allowing you to keep the garden there.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Scape? That's a new one on me. Oh well, I suppose I'm off to Google it!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ribbit, well the house doesn't close until July 27th so for now it is my garden. After that it is theirs. So all the greens will be picked, but only some of the summer veggies will get picked.

    The Idiot Gardener, Scapes are just allium flower stalks.

    ReplyDelete
  9. You are going to be so spoiled with the amount of produce you get from the 2 gardens next year. What will you do with yourself next year?

    ReplyDelete
  10. The Mom, I'm cheating. I'll have more square footage next year than I will this year with two gardens. I'm going to have trouble keeping up next year.

    ReplyDelete
  11. A bit behind you on the peas but should be catching up soon. I ate the first sugar snap pea while standing in the garden visiting with someone this weekend. More are coming and lots of blooms.

    Good harvest this week.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Daphne, I was hoping you could do a post on how such a large vegetable garden has helped or hindered selling your old house? This is something I think about at times with our house and our (eventual, someday) move. What were some of the things you and your realtor talked about? Did it even come up? Is it mentioned in the listing?

    ReplyDelete
  13. Jody, I'm not sure how it helped or hurt. The people that bought it want the garden. I know some that looked would have ripped it out. Most people that live in my old town don't vegetable garden (though this year I saw a couple new ones, but I always wonder how long they will last past the current garden boom). The town is too posh for it. I think I lucked out with someone that wanted it. My current town is a real mix of different kinds of people and there are a handful of yards that are all vegged over. So I think it just depends on where you live.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Oh and Jody I did discuss it with my RE Agent and she thought with today's current vegetable gardening craze it wouldn't hurt. But also understand that my garden from the outside looks very nice. I have a picket fence and perennials lining the outside of the fence. So from the outside it looks rather pretty. It is on the side yard and doesn't take up the back yard where the kids would be playing. Nor does it take up the front lawn area that everyone seems to want.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Where did you find seed for the Yakatta-Na? It looks delicious and, as you said, seems to hold up to the heat well. I need to get my hands on some for next year!

    ReplyDelete
  16. That was a good idea to bring your cooler with you to harvest.

    I've never hear of pickling snow peas. That's a good idea!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I love the peas, mine normal ones are just starting to come through, I was a bit late sowing them, not got round to sowing any sugar snap or mangetout yet, i'll have to hurry up if i'm going to get a harvest off them this year, HP.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Lisa Anne, I got the seeds from Fedco
    http://www.fedcoseeds.com/
    They are a seed coop (but you don't have to be a member to buy), so don't operate quite like a normal.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Lucky realestate lady. The raspberries at the back of my yard were harvested by a deer. I think he was chomping on the leaves, but it's so humid that I haven't been back there to check it yet.

    What amazed me was that he wasn't at all alarmed by my stepping out my back door. He just turned, gave me a look, and then went back to grazing.


    Great harvest. Your lettuce looks wonderful and galic scapes sound very good! Loved your peas. I really messed mine up this year, but I have high hopes for my bush bean.

    Thank you for Harvest Monday. It's wonderful to see what others are doing and it's a great way to learn.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Dang...you've got a nice harvest there, Daphne!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Lucky RE lady!

    I am also looking forward to the results Yakatta-Na heat test. Also I'd like to know how far the Paris Island romaine goes without bolting.

    Harvest Monday is lots of fun, how would it not attract gardeners? Thanks a lot for being our host, you've gathered around you a very nice community.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Nice harvest, love that pickle jar, I'll have to try pickle peas next, unfortunately I lost my crop to powdery mildew, I only get a handful of peas this spring. I may try again in the fall.
    Your Yakatta-Na looks like a Chinese vegetable "Spring Green" (literally translated from Chinese). I picked up the seeds while in CA, I'll have to grow both of them to see the difference.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Wonderful harvest! The pickled peas look delicious! I'm inspired by your pickled veggies. It's great that you have a buyer that will appreciate your garden.

    ReplyDelete
  24. It is wonderful how Harvest Monday has taken off. I've found that I like to see everyone's harvests but I just can't take the time to comment on every blog which I feel a little sad about, but it's just too much time at the desk and not enough in the garden.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Wow, you have an amazing harvest today. In your tallies for cost, do you factor in the cost for watering the plants too? I've been trying to track that also, since we pay for water consumed.

    ReplyDelete
  26. meemsnyc, no I don't. We get a lot of rain and I don't water often. Occasionally we get dry stretches or I think the plants need more than the rain we get. So far except for the seedling period I've watered once this year. It does take money, but it is too much work to figure it out. I also don't count my electricity for my transplants. In normal years (which isn't this year because I don't have anywhere for a fall garden right now) I have something on for about six months of the year. Though not most of them and often they are turned off when the seedlings go out for fresh air. This year that was often as our spring weather was weirdly hot.

    ReplyDelete
  27. My favorite blog reading day is "Harvest Mondays." It is really fun seeing what others are harvesting.

    Pickles Peas look good. I would like to give this a try. My pea pods are just beginning. Just a small hand full so far that was eaten in the garden.

    ReplyDelete
  28. You sold your house! Did I miss that announcement in an earlier post? I'm glad a gardener bought it, it will be nice to know someone appreciates the hard work you've put into establishing the garden.

    ReplyDelete
  29. how nice of someone to get to inherit an already growing garden! Thanks for letting me get in on this Harvest Monday!

    ReplyDelete
  30. Granny, Yup we signed a P&S. The house will be gone on July 27th. I hope they love the garden.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Pickled peas! Yum! Don't you just love how you can pickle anything and it turns out well?

    ReplyDelete
  32. Thought I'd join in on the fun! You grow the most amazing things - that I've never heard of. I'm enjoying your blog.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Yum! I finally have some peas podding up, I hope I have enough to make some of your pickled snap peas!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Daphne, what a beautiful turn out! Congratulations to you and all of the harvesters!

    ReplyDelete
  35. Having never had any luck growing garlic, I have a question. What are garlic scapes? Is it the tops of the plant? I also am jealous that you have peas and I don't though we are in much different growing zones. I am in a certified zone 3B but can get away with all the zone 4A and 4B plants as I can control the areas where I grow them. Happy gardening!Just a beside - because of all the rain we have had on the prairies of Canada we have only been able to harvest lettuce, spinach, green onions and radishes. Hoping with the heat and less rain this week that by early next week we will be able to add peas and strawberries to our bounty. Love your profile pic especially the hat and your blog. Keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Yum: garlic scapes! Mine are just starting to ... scape. Unfortunately, my garlic has rust, too, so I'm hoping that doesn't affect the harvest. Fingers crossed!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Jean, a scape is technically a leafless flower stalk. I've only heard the term used for alliums however. So garlic scapes are the flower stalks of the garlic. They tend to be picked small when they are tender. Most agree that garlic scapes should be picked off the plant to help the bulbs form up, but I've read in a few places that the bulbs are bigger if you leave them.

    Heavy Petal, my garlic has rust too. It had it last year and I had fine bulbs. Luckily the plants here don't seem to get it until June and a lot of their growth is already done.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Ok, I have to join in the fun. I'm new to a big veggie and fruit garden on Vancouver Island, BC. We're learning lots and so excited to be starting into serious harvest! I'll do my best to keep up on Mondays. :)

    After a VERY cold spring up here, we're harvesting peas, greens, strawberries and raspberries, currants, rhubarb, scapes (do these come from onions as well? I've got many mystery alliums, and once they started scape-ing, I assumed they were all garlic. But maybe not?), and waiting for the early potatoes and favas, which should be pickable any day now.

    I can't believe you've got cukes and tomatoes already!

    Best, Toni @ Backyard Feast

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hey, I love the idea of Harvest Monday.

    Pickled peas, I have never had those. I would love it if I can get enough peas to try, my peas are not doing so well this year, don't know why.

    -Brenda

    ReplyDelete
  40. http://greenlifeinsocal.wordpress.comJune 24, 2010 at 1:52 PM

    Thanks for the explanation of scapes. I have leek scapes right now. I'm letting some of them flower to collect seed, and plan to put a couple of flower heads into white vinegar to make leek vinegar. It's an experiment.

    ReplyDelete